Woodwork Wednesday: pallet raised beds

If you follow the blog or social media for our farm Wild Orchard Organic Farms, then you already know about this project.

Where we live, the soil is red clay. This is great for permanently staining your clothes and shoes and making pottery, but it really isn’t great for planting and growing. For this reason, we have recently started container gardening and raised bed gardening. Raised beds are most certainly expensive, and so is raised bed soil. Lumber is nearly astronomical right now.

My work routinely receives shipments on pallets, of which they then have to dispose. Most of the time, pallets have broken slats, but still a lot of usuable wood on them. I took home seven pallets, took them apart (which was the hard part) and decided what size I wanted them to be. I framed the corners with some old 4×4 posts that I had.

And then I built five of them. Eventually, I will sand them all and paint them all white.

Then, I cut the bags in half and removed the bottoms and tops of them, and used them as a weed barrier. I then added the Miracle Grow raised bed mix.

My daughter even helped me spread the soil.

If you want to know more about this project, please click the link here. Have a great Wednesday!

New Uses for Old Things: DIY plant pots

Lately, I find myself trying to save money on my gardening supplies. If you aren’t careful, you can spend a lot on seed cells and plant pots. Why not try to use some of what you already have on hand?

I must have about a hundred of these. And yogurt cups! I decided to peel the labels off and wash them out.

I then spray painted them a color I liked.

And I let them dry for about a day.

Don’t forget to drill a drainage hole in the bottom of the cup.

And then your super cute planters are ready to go!

DIY Raised Beds

About four years ago, my grandpa and I built some farmhouse shutters. You may remember them from this post.

I no longer have the window in my kitchen where these were used, and I don’t have anywhere else I’d like to use them. You know lumber is crazy expensive now and I’ve been itching for some raised beds.

I started by removing the hinges and hardware from the shutters. I left the basic shutter shape though.

I then simply joined the sides with wood screws.

And then I added cardboard and chicken wire to the bottom.

Tomorrow I am putting potting soil and plants in it. I can’t wait to show you what I plant.

I am also recycling some other former projects to create more raised beds.

Life as a Lumber: what we’ve been up to!

Hi, all! After a short, busy summer, we are now (mostly) back on a regular blogging schedule. We’ve been a bit quiet here on the blogging front as we are trying to establish our farm and spend time together as a family.

If you follow me on Instagram or TiKToK, you already have seen some of this.

1. On the farm front

We have grown our backyard flock to five chickens. I definitely want more of them- I have developed a liking to silkie chickens. Look at those little fluffy butts! They’re too cute for words.

Our squash is done, our lettuce is done, and our corn and cucumbers never did a thing! We are still getting some delicious watermelons, banana peppers and tomatoes. We already have started seeds for our fall garden and greenhouse.

We are also adding some raised bed gardens to our farm…look for more on that this week.

On the home front

Our sweet family finally got to take a vacation to the beach. We had a blast: sand, sunburn and all.
It was lots of fun and I’m glad we got to go.

Back to school

These little stinkers start back to school and dance this week!

I hope you all are having a wonderful weekend! We will see you this week for the following posts:

New Uses for Old Things: herb plant pots

Back to school photo shoot tips

Lumber in my Minivan: repurposed raised beds

Have a wonderful weekend!

Installing a portable greenhouse part one

If you know me very well, you know about my penchant for planting a large garden and starting it from seeds. I’ve been toying with the idea of buying a polytunnel for a long time but talked myself out of it due to the price.

I did a lot of research and discovered a portable polytunnel with good reviews that was well within my budget. It came in a neatly packaged box and was so easy to put together .

First, decide where you want the polytunnel to sit. Then, unbox everything and spread it out. Once you locate all the pieces, begin assembling the frame. It’s best to assemble it where you want it to be.

Once your frame is up, decide how you want to secure it. They include anchors but these anchors are no match for a Carolina wind storm. Some people use t posts to anchor it. We chose to build a small wood foundation and anchor the frame with metal straps. I’ll post a picture of that later.

Getting the cover lined up correctly can be tricky. Line up your cover and then secure it. It should fit tight but not so tight you can’t zip the doors closed.

This is what it looks like inside. We are far from done. We have just finished the wood foundation and used a stable mat for the floor. Soon, we will be adding shelves.

We hope you have enjoyed part one of our greenhouse tour. We will show you the finished product next week.