Board and Batten farmhouse shutters: a ridiculously easy DIY

Board and Batten farmhouse shutters: a ridiculously easy DIY

Our kitchen had this awkward window above the sink, which looked into the dining room. It was random and weird, and I couldn’t decide what to do with it. I thought about putting a cafe rod and curtains there, but I really didn’t want to do that.

I wanted something more unique. I spotted some scrap wood in my garage and I had an idea: why not create some simple, rustic shutters? I measured the opening and cut the wood. Then, I bought some cute hinges and handles.

Here they are all laid out but not actually put together.

I constructed four shutters with crossbars like this:

I then painted them white, as you can see.

I attached the hinges on the insides of the shutters so I could accordion close them into the sides of the opening.

I absolutely love how much character these simple, rustic shutters add to our kitchen.

What rustic DIY have you recently created?

What can you make with pool noodles?

What can you make with pool noodles?

What can you make with

Pool noodles are ridiculously cheap, and you can find them almost anywhere. And while most of us use them to float in a pool, there are many other ways you can use them as well. In today’s Pinterest roundup, I’d like to share some creative ideas for repurposing pool noodles.

You can use them to make a cheap wreath form for a lot cheaper than a foam wreath form.

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Hometalk

You can use them to make a footstool for your house, or a faux stone column, or pool noodle luminaries.

pool noodle footstool

Mother Daughter Projects

stone column

Epbot

luminaries

Create. Craft. Love.

Make an obstacle course, a sprinkler, or a track for marble racing.

marble track

Sortrature

A pool noodle obstacle course would be a great, easy and cheap fun activity for your kids.

pool noodle obstacle course

PBS Kids

You can cut the pool noodles to create stamps and paint a pattern.

paint.jpg

Instagram

Next week, I’ll share how to organize your home with pool noodles. Have a wonderful weekend, and visit us here tomorrow for a GIVEAWAY!

 

Creating a DIY Rustic Coat Rack

Creating a DIY Rustic Coat Rack

We had an awkward blank wall in our bedroom that was just begging for some rustic charm. I thought about buying a coat rack, but I couldn’t find what I wanted at the right price.

Then I found these super cute drawer knobs at Hobby Lobby. I loved the detail and “antique” look of them.

I immediately knew that I wanted to use them. I went to the garage and grabbed a scrap board. I stained it using Minwax Mohogany.

I then measured the board and marked where I wanted the knobs to go. Next, I drilled the holes.

I then inserted the knobs and screwed the bolts and washers to the board.

Now I no longer have an awkward, empty space, and a handy, cute new place to hang clothes.

What rustic DIY projects have you done lately?

Make it Monday: Paint stick burlap star

Make it Monday: Paint stick burlap star

You may recall when I made the folk art-inspired flag from paint sticks this summer. My folk art flag was beginning to fall apart and it had passed its phase of being useful…so I decided to repurpose it.

I started by taking the flag apart. See the paint? I didn’t bother taking the paint off since the sticks would be covered with burlap.

I laid it out in a star pattern and hot glued it together.

Then I began wrapping the star in wide burlap ribbon, taking the time to glue it at each pass. It took a long time and lots of ribbon, but when I finished, I had this:

I’m planning to hang it up and hang a wreath in the center of it. Isn’t it cute?

What crafts have you done lately?

Make it Monday: Easy Farmhouse Candlesticks

Make it Monday: Easy Farmhouse Candlesticks

I love chunky, wooden turned candlesticks, but they can be costly. Did you know you can easily DIY them from materials you can find in most hardware stores?

I was in Lowe’s earlier this week when I happened upon these lovely turned table legs.

I purchased the terra cotta saucers from Rural King.

I then used wood glue to glue saucers to one end of the legs, but for the end with the screw? I chose to drill a hole in the saucers.

I learned that you can soak your terra cotta pots overnight in water and drill a hole with a standard drill bit. No masonry bit needed!

I then bolted the saucers on and painted them white with two coats of chalk paint.

I’m happy with how they turned out, but I’m thinking of cutting one of the taller candlesticks down so I’ll have three varying sizes. I love the look of these and I know they’ll look great on our mantle.

This was a DIY project that didn’t cost much, and it was easy and fun to do. I love how cute these candlesticks are as well!

Have a wonderful week.