Creating rustic bathroom shelves from plumbing pipes

Creating rustic bathroom shelves from plumbing pipes

make industrial farmhouse shelves

Our bathrooms in our home are very spacious, but they’re also very boring. They are both very plain and builder-grade. We’ve recently begun to look at them to see how we might add some character without spending a lot of money on them.

organized &shelfbathshowerjust for youbathroom vanity

We do eventually plan to replace the tubs, tub surround, and flooring, but that will be a costly renovation, and it just isn’t in the budget right now. Instead, we are comparison shopping and trying to decide just what we want when the time comes.

At the present time, though, we can add just a little farmhouse character to our baths without breaking our checkbook.

We have decided to add some sort of rustic shelving, swap out that builder grade mirror for a more farmhouse-styled one, maybe paint or re-stain the vanity, and upgrade that cheap light fixture, but until we do that, we’ve opted to add some rustic shelving. These are the shelves you’ve seen on Fixer Upper, and all over Pinterest. And they’re the perfect project for adding a little industrial farmhouse to your home.

Adding rustic shelving is super easy, and not that expensive. Here’s what you’ll need to get started to make two plumbing pipe shelves.

2X10 pine board

4 3/4 in galvanized pipe nipples

4 3/4 in floor flanges

4 3/4 in pipe caps

your choice wood stain (I used Minwax Walnut)

black spray paint

microfiber cloth

sandpaper/orbital sander

I didn’t take step by step pics of the prep work, because it’s monotonous and self-explanatory. First, measure the area where you want your shelves to hang. Once you know your needed dimensions, you can cut your board to the appropriate lengths. Remember to measure twice and cut once! Next, use sandpaper, or an orbital sander to sand your boards smooth. Afterward, wipe the sawdust from your boards with a microfiber cloth.Then, apply the wood stain using a rag or brush. Allow each coat to dry at least 24 hours. Using your black spray paint, paint the galvanized pipe parts black. Allow 24 hours to dry.  For best results, use a spray paint with a primer included.

 

After your boards have dried, measure the area once more you want to hang your shelves. Use a level to make sure your boards are level, and mark the wall where you’ll screw the floor flanges. I highly recommend hanging your shelves on a stud to make them more sturdy, but if you can’t, then you’ll need to use dry wall anchors.

floorflange

 

After you’ve screwed the flanges to the wall, then you can assemble the pipe nipples and caps.

shelf pipe

Repeat this step for each side of your shelves. Then, you simply lay your shelf boards attop the pipes, and you’re done!

2 pipe shelves

Yes, you can totally see where I filledi n the giant holes left behind by the towel bar. They were huge and required lots and lots of spackle.

But, here’s the (mostly) finished product.

organized & (1)

I love how these shelves add so much rustic charm and character to our bathroom…plus, they add some much needed storage. Our vanity in this bathroom is rather small and there isn’t much counter space.

Have you made any rustic pipe shelves lately? If so, I’d love for you to show me!

Have a wonderful week.

 

Reduce, reuse, UPcycle: how to create beautiful new things you’ll love to use from the things you already have

I have a kid who loves pickles. I cannot keep pickles in the house.

As I’m sure you can imagine, I regularly have these.

They’re remarkably easy to reuse and upcycle. Just soak them in hot water and remove the label. If a sticky residue remains, use a little Goo Gone or some acetone (but be sure to use either of these in a well-ventilated area due to the harsh fumes).

Then, remove the lids and use your choice of spray paint to give them a nice coat of paint. I chose a metallic silver and I had to do three coats to cover the Mt Olive green.

Then, I let them dry.

These are pretty cute all on their own, but they needed a little something more. I added a crystal cabinet pull knob to the top. You can glue them, but they work so much better when you drill a little hole in the lid and screw them on.

And then you end up with this adorable little canister. You can fill them with candy for a cute little candy dish, use them in the bathroom to hold cotton balls and q-tips, or just display them. It’s really up to you.

Have a wonderful week!

Creating captain’s mirrors from cake pans

Creating captain’s mirrors from cake pans

captains mirrors

I recently went on a search for captain’s mirrors to hang above our new hallway console table. However, a recent Google search proved that captain’s mirrors are typically expensive.

Screen Shot 2018-02-03 at 8.50.41 PM

I began to wonder how I could create my own captain’s mirror. I tried to make one from a stove eye cover, but it was too flimsy and not deep enough.

I decided to try to make one from a round cake pan. To create your own captain’s mirror my way, you will need the following:

2 10-inch round cake pans

2 9-inch beveled edge mirrors

1-inch blocks of wood (four per mirror)

3/4 inch machine screws

Cardboard cut in a circle the same size as the cake pan

D-rings with screws

twine or an old leather belt (your choice. I used twine)

My cake pans were just basic round pans. They were super cheap. I began by drilling holes in the pans, and screwing the wood blocks where I wanted them with the machine screws.

cake pan mirror 2

I attached the D-rings to the sides of the pan with the machine screws.

d rings

Then, I attached the cardboard round to the pan by screwing it to the wood blocks.

cardboard mirror

I then painted the cardboard black and allowed it to dry. Next, I attached the mirror with all-purpose adhesive. I attached jute twine to the D-rings, but you could use leather, a chain, or whatever strikes your fancy. I also ended up painting the rest of the pans black with some chalk paint, which I then antiqued.

console 2

console

I think that added a lot of character to these mirrors.  Now they are fancying up our otherwise boring hallway.

What could you do with re-purposed cake pans? I bet the possiblities are endless.

 

 

Make it Monday: Easy Farmhouse Candlesticks

Make it Monday: Easy Farmhouse Candlesticks

I love chunky, wooden turned candlesticks, but they can be costly. Did you know you can easily DIY them from materials you can find in most hardware stores?

I was in Lowe’s earlier this week when I happened upon these lovely turned table legs.

I purchased the terra cotta saucers from Rural King.

I then used wood glue to glue saucers to one end of the legs, but for the end with the screw? I chose to drill a hole in the saucers.

I learned that you can soak your terra cotta pots overnight in water and drill a hole with a standard drill bit. No masonry bit needed!

I then bolted the saucers on and painted them white with two coats of chalk paint.

I’m happy with how they turned out, but I’m thinking of cutting one of the taller candlesticks down so I’ll have three varying sizes. I love the look of these and I know they’ll look great on our mantle.

This was a DIY project that didn’t cost much, and it was easy and fun to do. I love how cute these candlesticks are as well!

Have a wonderful week.

“Spring” cleaning: a newly organized shed

Due to my work schedule, I don’t get to deep clean as often as I want. Don’t get me wrong, I keep a clean house, but I don’t have tons of time to do some of the deep cleaning tasks that require a little more elbow grease.

Most people do spring cleaning, however, I do winter break cleaning and summer cleaning…because I’m a teacher and that’s when I have the most time.

Certain areas of my home have been in need of a good clean out and organizing. My shed, where I keep home decorations and home improvement supplies, (we don’t have an attic), had gotten pretty out of hand.

OK, it got really out of hand. So out of hand I was waiting on some squatters to walk out. I am ashamed of myself for letting it get this bad.

I tackled my ridiculously messy she-shed the best way I knew how: by dragging everything out of it and cleaning out the shed.

This isn’t even close to everything.

I did just that, and almost immediately a large cloud developed and I was sure a downpour was coming. Thankfully, the rain waited until I’d finished.

I want two of these, but I have other things I need to buy more. So I’m adding them to my list.

I had three shelves in the garage from where I recently replaced the girls’ bookshelves, so I repurposed them in the shed.

I still need a better way to store my totes though.

My shed is certainly not complete, but it’s definitely a 1000 times better than it was! Stay tuned- this project is definitely still in the making.

What projects are you currently working on?