Building a faux fireplace mantle

Building an antique fireplace mantle

Last month, I told you all about how my husband and I purchased and antique fireplace mantle.

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We have a long, blank and boring wall in our living room, that unfortunately is our focal wall when you walk in the door. I’ve always wanted a pretty fireplace on that wall but knew we couldn’t afford a real one. A faux one was the next best thing 🙂

Using a plan from Bless’r House as a model, we decided how large the mantle and hearth would need to be and we purchased the wood.

Here is a list of what we used to build the fireplace:

  • Antique mantle (found through local antiques dealers)
  • 2 plywood sheets
  • Faux brick panel
  • 11 2×4 boards
  • 2 1X12 boards
  • 1 2×12 board
  • Finishing nails
  • Deck screws
  • Drywall screws
  • Tape measure and yard stick
  • Circular saw
  • Jigsaw
  • Hammer
  • Power drill

We began by deciding how large we wanted the hearth to be and we cut two 2X4sat 64 inches long. We chose 64 inches because this made the hearth a tiny bit wider than the mantle itself. The cross pieces and sides are 24 inches.

fireplace hearth 1

We then cut a piece of plywood to fit the top of the hearth, but we did not hammer it down yet.

Copy of fireplace surround 3

We then carried the hearth into the house, placed it where we wanted it, and attached it to the baseboards. We then attached the plywood to the top of the hearth.

finished hearth

We then attached plywood strips and two by fours to the back of the mantle.

fireplace surround braces

After attaching the two by fours to the side, and the plywood strips, we cut out a surround from one of the plywood sheets. I attached it using small wood screws.

fireplace surround 2

I then attached 2X4s to the wall at the correct height to the wall. Be sure to hang these on studs, but if you can’t, make sure you use drywall anchors that can accommodate heavy weights.

Copy of Copy of Copy of fireplace no brick

I then attached the 1X12s for the side braces to the 2x4s.

Copy of Copy of fireplace no brick

I then put the mantle up beside these braces, and attached the two by fours on the back of the mantle to the braces. I used decking screws to do this.

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I then realized we had about an eight inch gap between the mantle and the wall.

Copy of fireplace no brick

Attaching a 2X6 to this space covered the gap and laid flush with the back of the mantle.

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We then cut and added faux brick paneling to the wall behind the mantle and on the sides so that the inside of the mantle couldn’t be seen.

fireplace almost finished

We have nearly finished the mantle. We now only have to paint, add the stone, and fill in some nail holes. Our living room looks so much better already! Can’t wait to share the finished product with you all!

fireplace almost finished

Restoring an antique fireplace mantle

Last weekend, I posted this picture on Instagram, leading my followers to wonder what I’m up to.

I’m going to go ahead and tell you that this project will take several posts, and I’ll be talking about it for the next few weeks…but I’m happy to scratch the surface today.

This absolutely lovely antique mantle has been in my garage for almost two years. I knew what I wanted to do with it but just couldn’t find the time. Story of my life. I knew I wanted it done by December so I felt compelled to stop dragging my feet and just do it.

Then, there was a whole lotta strippin’ going on, and not the sexy kind. At least this kind of stripper doesn’t smell bad. Just brush it on with a paintbrush and wait thirty minutes. Then, scrape that paint right off. You may have to repeat the process, if there are several layers of paint to remove. I had to do this three times.

Plus, the stripper gives everything a pinkish hue, which is also lots of fun.

I used low grit sandpaper and a plastic putty knife to scrape away the paint. I’ve almost got all the paint off.

And if you’ll tune in next week, I’ll show you the second installment. Come see us next Tuesday to see what I’m doing with this mantle.

Board and Batten farmhouse shutters: a ridiculously easy DIY

Board and Batten farmhouse shutters: a ridiculously easy DIY

Our kitchen had this awkward window above the sink, which looked into the dining room. It was random and weird, and I couldn’t decide what to do with it. I thought about putting a cafe rod and curtains there, but I really didn’t want to do that.

I wanted something more unique. I spotted some scrap wood in my garage and I had an idea: why not create some simple, rustic shutters? I measured the opening and cut the wood. Then, I bought some cute hinges and handles.

Here they are all laid out but not actually put together.

I constructed four shutters with crossbars like this:

I then painted them white, as you can see.

I attached the hinges on the insides of the shutters so I could accordion close them into the sides of the opening.

I absolutely love how much character these simple, rustic shutters add to our kitchen.

What rustic DIY have you recently created?

What can you make with pool noodles?

What can you make with pool noodles?

What can you make with

Pool noodles are ridiculously cheap, and you can find them almost anywhere. And while most of us use them to float in a pool, there are many other ways you can use them as well. In today’s Pinterest roundup, I’d like to share some creative ideas for repurposing pool noodles.

You can use them to make a cheap wreath form for a lot cheaper than a foam wreath form.

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Hometalk

You can use them to make a footstool for your house, or a faux stone column, or pool noodle luminaries.

pool noodle footstool

Mother Daughter Projects

stone column

Epbot

luminaries

Create. Craft. Love.

Make an obstacle course, a sprinkler, or a track for marble racing.

marble track

Sortrature

A pool noodle obstacle course would be a great, easy and cheap fun activity for your kids.

pool noodle obstacle course

PBS Kids

You can cut the pool noodles to create stamps and paint a pattern.

paint.jpg

Instagram

Next week, I’ll share how to organize your home with pool noodles. Have a wonderful weekend, and visit us here tomorrow for a GIVEAWAY!

 

Creating a DIY Rustic Coat Rack

Creating a DIY Rustic Coat Rack

We had an awkward blank wall in our bedroom that was just begging for some rustic charm. I thought about buying a coat rack, but I couldn’t find what I wanted at the right price.

Then I found these super cute drawer knobs at Hobby Lobby. I loved the detail and “antique” look of them.

I immediately knew that I wanted to use them. I went to the garage and grabbed a scrap board. I stained it using Minwax Mohogany.

I then measured the board and marked where I wanted the knobs to go. Next, I drilled the holes.

I then inserted the knobs and screwed the bolts and washers to the board.

Now I no longer have an awkward, empty space, and a handy, cute new place to hang clothes.

What rustic DIY projects have you done lately?