Building a faux fireplace mantle, part 3

When we last left you, our beautiful antique mantle with its faux firebox looked like this:

Nothing was painted, no stone was laid. Things were kinda bare. And unfinished.

Our first item on the agenda was to paint it.

First, we caulked any cracks or areas we felt needed filling in. We painted the mantle and the adjoining boards behind it with white paint in satin finish.

Next, we installed Airstone to the surround and the bottom of the hearth.

This stuff is amazingly easy and fun to work with. Simply spread the adhesive on the back of the stones like you’re frosting a cake and press into place. You can also cut the stone with a hacksaw or circular saw.

We then laid faux slate vinyl tiles across the top of the hearth. We may upgrade it later to real slate but I am loving how this looks, and how little it cost.

We then painted the faux brick paneling with some matte black chalk paint. I just like the finish.

We still have a few areas to fill in and some trim to add, but all in all, I am loving it!

Stay tuned! The rest of our living room is about to change in a big way, and I can’t wait to show it to you!!

Have a great Monday!

Restoring an antique fireplace mantle

Last weekend, I posted this picture on Instagram, leading my followers to wonder what I’m up to.

I’m going to go ahead and tell you that this project will take several posts, and I’ll be talking about it for the next few weeks…but I’m happy to scratch the surface today.

This absolutely lovely antique mantle has been in my garage for almost two years. I knew what I wanted to do with it but just couldn’t find the time. Story of my life. I knew I wanted it done by December so I felt compelled to stop dragging my feet and just do it.

Then, there was a whole lotta strippin’ going on, and not the sexy kind. At least this kind of stripper doesn’t smell bad. Just brush it on with a paintbrush and wait thirty minutes. Then, scrape that paint right off. You may have to repeat the process, if there are several layers of paint to remove. I had to do this three times.

Plus, the stripper gives everything a pinkish hue, which is also lots of fun.

I used low grit sandpaper and a plastic putty knife to scrape away the paint. I’ve almost got all the paint off.

And if you’ll tune in next week, I’ll show you the second installment. Come see us next Tuesday to see what I’m doing with this mantle.

A super simple fall wreath…and it’s made from a pool noodle!!

A Super Simple Fall Wreath

 

I just made a super cute, super simple fall wreath for my back door, and I made it using items from the Dollar Tree. Even my wreath form, which is nothing other than a POOL NOODLE!

I simply bent the ends together, hot glued the ends together, and wrapped a bit of duct tape around the joint to hold it together.

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I then completely wrapped the wreath frame in burlap ribbon, hot gluing it as I wrapped each piece. I used about 4 rolls of ribbon and several glue sticks.

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I then affixed a pipe cleaner to the back of the wreath as a hanger, and then affixed the flowers to my wreath form.

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I am terrible at making bows, so my aunt made one for me. I then attached my bow to the wreath and hung it on my porch.

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Not too bad for a $12 wreath 🙂

 

 

What can you make with pool noodles?

What can you make with pool noodles?

What can you make with

Pool noodles are ridiculously cheap, and you can find them almost anywhere. And while most of us use them to float in a pool, there are many other ways you can use them as well. In today’s Pinterest roundup, I’d like to share some creative ideas for repurposing pool noodles.

You can use them to make a cheap wreath form for a lot cheaper than a foam wreath form.

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Hometalk

You can use them to make a footstool for your house, or a faux stone column, or pool noodle luminaries.

pool noodle footstool

Mother Daughter Projects

stone column

Epbot

luminaries

Create. Craft. Love.

Make an obstacle course, a sprinkler, or a track for marble racing.

marble track

Sortrature

A pool noodle obstacle course would be a great, easy and cheap fun activity for your kids.

pool noodle obstacle course

PBS Kids

You can cut the pool noodles to create stamps and paint a pattern.

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Instagram

Next week, I’ll share how to organize your home with pool noodles. Have a wonderful weekend, and visit us here tomorrow for a GIVEAWAY!