Scrap Wood Challenge: Finishing the Adirondack Chairs and Tables

This page is not a building plan, or even a tutorial. Think of it as more like an “update.” Remember these chairs?

And do you remember these tables?

Technically only two of our chairs are scrap wood builds, as we actually purchased the lumber to build the other two. The tables are scrap wood builds as well.

I always knew once these chairs and tables were finished, I wanted to paint them a bright color. Since we have a gray house with black shutters, I envisioned a bright red or a navy blue. But before I painted them, I filled in the holes with wood filler, sanded the chairs with 40 grit sandpaper and an orbital sander, and I put two coats of primer.

I learned something while painting these chairs: if you’re painting something that is raw wood and has never been painted or stained, you will need to use a good primer first. I applied two coats of primer to my chairs and tables prior to painting them. You also only need about 45 minutes drying time between both coats.

I let the two coats of primer dry for about 24 hours, and then I applied the red. I just love this color. It’s Benjamin Moore outdoor paint and it’s called “million dollar red.”

I ended up applying two coats to each piece of furniture, and allowing 24 hours drying time between the coats.

Our cute little firepit area is far from finished, but I can’t help but love the way these tables and chairs turned out. The coolest thing is about the whole area is that we built the furniture ourselves. I can’t wait to show you the finished patio. Stay tuned!

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Scrap Wood Challenge: Adirondack tables

This week we are once again sharing a scrap Wood challenge, but as my husband pointed out, is it really a challenge to build something from an Ana White plan? After all, she makes it so easy.

And what is a group of Adirondack chairs without a side table? I truly did challenge myself with this one, as I did not use any kind of plan. I simply figured out how big I wanted the table and went from there. I didn’t really think I’d need a plan, as a table really isn’t hard to build.

You will need:

4 2×4’s cut to 15 inches (45 degree angle on each side)

5 1×4’s cut at 17 inches

4 2×2’s at 18 inches

2” wood screws

1. I began by cutting my 2x4s to 15 inches at 45 degrees on each end.

You will want your cuts to be in the opposite direction.

2. Make a “picture frame.”

Then, drive your screws at an angle to join the edges.

2. Flip it over and attach the slats at 1/4 inch apart.

A little imperfection is ok.

3. Flip it back over and attach the four table legs.

Almost done!

4. Flip your table over

You have just built a table!!

And now you can sand or paint it any way you like!! Hope you enjoyed!

Scrap lumber challenge: Ana’s Adirondack chairs

My husband and I are in the midst of cleaning out our garage. While most of the “clean up needs” are simply a matter of putting things away, my scrap wood pile is a pretty big issue.

Yikes. That’s a lot of scrap wood.

Maybe I should change my blog name to “Lumber freaking everywhere.” Seriously, my scrap wood pile has gotten a little out of hand. With the cost of lumber these days, you can’t throw it out or waste it. I decided instead I’d build something from the scrap wood instead. My dad and I did a lot of woodworking projects together, I always enjoyed it, and I really miss it. And since we are quarantined, it isn’t like I have tons of things to do.

I wanted some wooden adirondack chairs for our new firepit patio, but I didn’t want to pay for them. Also, a lot of wooden adirondack chairs are overpriced, not real wood, and not very sturdy. If you aren’t familiar with Ana White, you should be. She is a blogger in Alaska who does tons of woodwork projects. She also publishes very thorough plans with diagrams and pictures, step by step instructions, a shopping list and even a cut list so you will know how long to cut your boards. They’re also 100% free!! I flipped through her plan catalogue and found an adirondack chair plan I thought I could build.

Source: Ana White
Source: Ana White

See how easy she makes this? Her plans are phenomenal.

I happened to have enough scrap wood to build two chairs. I only needed to buy the screws. I quickly cut out all the pieces I’d need for two chairs.

Here are all the pieces for one chair.
  1. Begin by taking your front and back legs and attaching your stringer piece to them. I chose to attach the top of the stringer piece at 11 inches. This will be one side of your chair- two legs and a seat support.

2. Flip over your chair and attach your 2×2. This is your arm rest support. You will want this on the opposite side of your stringer piece.

3.Then, you will mirror this on the other side .

And now you have both sides of your chair base completed.

4. Join your two sides of your chair base together with a 2×4 stretcher piece.

It’s starting to look more like a chair!

5. Now you attach five chair slats to your seat support at 1/2 an inch apart.

6. Get yourself a really cute shop cat to follow you around and meow at you while you work. Actually, that step is optional.

Tommie Gray keeps an eye on things.

7. Build the back of your chair. Connect your back slats using two 2×4 bracers. I did mine at 1/4 inch apart.

8. Flip it over and secure the 1x4s to the 2×4 bracers using 2 inch wood screws.

9. Attach your back brace to your chair frame, and secure the chair back to the brace.

10. And finally, attach your arm rests to the chair.

Annie Sue likes the new chair. She thinks it’s hers.

And then you have a comfy adirondack chair, made from real, solid wood. Shop cat approved!

I ended up building two of these chairs from scrap wood, and purchasing lumber to build two more. I’ve now built four of these chairs altogether and one side table. I still need to fill in the holes with wood filler, sand them, paint them, and put them out by our fire pit.

I can’t wait to show you the finished product, and next week I will show you how I built the side table.

Four Farmhouse Projects

Four Farmhouse Projects

four farmhouse projects

 

I hope you all had a wonderful weekend! This time of year is always a busy one for teachers, so I never seem to post as many blog posts as I’d like. Today, I’d like to share some super cute farmhouse projects with you all.

  1. Classic farmhouse wooden sign 

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You can make this one with just a stencil, some scrap wood, some paint and some wood stain. You can even freehand it if you’re more artistically talented than I am. There are so many things I want to put on a sign like this one! I can’t wait to make a few more.

 

2.  Wooden Farmhouse planter box 

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I made this box from some mis-measured wood pieces from another project, and some walnut wood stain. I have used this box for Christmas, for spring, for fall, and for winter. It’s so much fun to decorate with!

3. Farmhouse chunky wood candlesticks 

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These super cute, very farmhouse candlesticks are made from wood-turned chair legs, terra-cota flower pot saucers, and chalk paint. I ended up with three really nice candlesticks for around $20.

4. DIY Rustic wood coat rack 

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This rustic wood coat rack is made from a plank of scrap wood, some walnut stain, and some Hobby Lobby drawer pulls. It adds a unique touch to our room and was super easy to make too!

 

Well, what are you waiting for? Grab some scrap wood and some walnut stain and get to creating! I can’t wait to see what you make.

A quick and easy bathroom room refresh

A quick and easy bathroom room refresh

Room refresh

We are on a constant mission around here to add some character to our builder grade, blank slate house. We want to do some major remodeling to our bathroom, but like most people, we have other expenses and have to do a little at a time.

Our bathrooms were very drab and builder grade. Here is a look at our bathroom before we started.

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You can’t see it that well, but behind our toilet is the standard towel rack.

We’ve had these Allen + Roth mirrors sitting in our garage floor since Christmas.

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Source

We had a friend from church over to help us move a piano, and he graciously agreed to help take down the plate glass mirror we used to have. While the mirror was down, I patched holes in the wall, sanded, and painted the wall. We then put up these two mirrors we purchased with a gift card at Christmas time.

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Next, my brother in law took down our cheap, builder grade vanity lights and installed these Allen + Roth barn lights.

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Here’s a picture with the lights off so you can see them a bit better. Don’t you just love that detail?

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We then changed out the standard nickel drawer pulls and cabinet knobs in favor of rubbed oil bronze hardware that would match the lights. We also changed out the toilet paper rack and towel racks so they would match as well.

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I then recreated my pipe and board shelves from the other bathroom. I’m not 100% satisfied with how they’re decorated, and am currently looking for the perfect typographical art to complete them. Big surprise, right?

Let’s take a look at that before and after again.

Before:

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After:

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Ignore my tiny photo bomber.

We are not yet finished. Our to-do list looks a little like this:

Replace large mirror with two smaller framed ones 

Replace builder grade vanity lights with barn style lights 

Replace cabinet and drawer pulls 

Replace towel bars and toilet paper rack with bronze hardware 

Install pipe shelves behind toilet 

Replace toilet

Replace faucets with bronze faucets

Replace flooring with hex tile or ceramic “wood-look” flooring

Replace bath tub

Install tile tub surround

Stain vanity

 

As you can see, we still have quite a few bathroom projects left before we are finished, and most of them are expensive! That is why we are doing this a little at a time.

Have you ever remodeled a room a little at a time? How did you do it? How did you prioritize your projects?

Comment and share below!